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Details The location of the:Home Page >> Encyclopedia >> Aeromodel >> Details
Watching a Film in Your Car, Before the Age of the Small Screen
Date:2013-2-28    Publisher:本站原创

Watching a Film in Your Car, Before the Age of the Small Screen


 

By VOA
02 December, 2012

From VOA Learning English, welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in Special English. I'm June Simms.

Drive-in movie theaters are considered an American invention. Drive-ins became very popular in the United States after World World Two. They combined two popular loves in America: cars and movies. So why did most of the drive-ins later close? That was a question VOA's Christopher Cruise often wondered about. This week on our program he looks for the answer.

The first drive-in movie theater opened in the United States in 1933. Popular Science magazine described a theater in Camden, New Jersey, as the first of its kind in the word: an open-air movie theater just for motorists. People could watch a film on the big screen while sitting in their car, eating, talking and relaxing.

Many drive-in theaters opened in the 1950s, as the American economy expanded after the war and more people bought cars.

In the 1960s -- when I was a boy -- there were between 4,000 and 6,000 drive-in theaters in the United States. I lived in the northeastern state of Maine. Not a lot of people live there. Yet my parents could take me and my three brothers and two sisters to any of four drive-ins located within an hour's drive of our home. But almost as soon as drive-ins were everywhere, their popularity began to fade. Today, fewer than 400 are still operating in the United States.

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